Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Article # 106 Important Firsts

As our first son grew and developed, we carefully recorded each first: rolling over, sitting up, standing up, walking, first word, first smile, first tooth, etc. All the details were written down in his baby scrapbook, then letters and photos were shared with doting grandparents who lived many states away. Other firsts would come: first fall, trip to the doctor for immunizations, tantrums, use of the word “no,” and other unmentionables like playing in the toilet or running around naked. Later babies would not get the same amount of attention as our firstborn because life was too busy as more children were added to our family. (Photo of our firstborn with his Hatch grandparents.)

Interestingly enough, childhood diseases came our way despite umpteen immunizations. My oldest son got the chicken pox and gave it to me when I was 7 months pregnant with his brother. That wasn’t fun. Seems that I, as an only child, had somehow avoided many common childhood illnesses. I quickly discovered that moms are expected to be trained nurses. Knowing how to diagnose and treat a wide variety of diseases. Plus caring for and cleaning up after sick members of the family in spite of other responsibilities was my job.

Eventually with three active sons, we made at least one trip a month to the ER mostly for stitches usually on the head or face of my rough and tumble boys. Just a simple swing at the playground could turn into a speedy and expensive visit to the hospital. Ever try to hold a wiggly little kid down who definitely doesn’t want anyone near with needles as the doctor tries to stitch his cut back together? It’s not easy as you try not to cry as your child is hurt and screaming to the high heavens. (Sons #1 and 2-Daniel and Frank.)

In my day, they had a cradle board to wrap around the injured child to keep them still. I can remember my second son who innocently fell off the seat at a picnic table and cut his lip. Of course we rushed him to the hospital and had a special plastic surgeon put in the stitches above his lip. That was accomplished but in returning weeks later to get the stitches out, my son would not hold still and reopened the wound. I began to dread each day wondering who would fall on the coffee table or going down steps. You can’t child proof your life.

7 comments:

Jean said...

Love the photo of the two little boys, Lin.

Kay said...

I had a rough and tumble boy, too. I was worried that he would glow from all the X-rays he had to get from all the bones he broke. And then one day he grew up and stopped breaking anything (well... in himself that is). I've told him that my hair turned gray because of him.

kavita said...

The picture is nice .Before i leave for work i give thousand instructions to the baby sitter ,my boy is very active and is jumping or running around all the time.I see a big sigh of relief on baby sitter's face when i come back from my work .

Linda Reeder said...

My son has had several sets of stitches and a broken collar bone twice before he reached adulthood. Because he plays soccer at the age of 35 he still gets beat up.

郁雨郁雨 said...

一個人的價值,應該看他貢獻了什麼,而不是他取得了什麼.................................................................

ramblingwoods.com said...

We did our share of ER visits but for illness not injury..love the photo of the boys...sweet...

jeffrachellehulet.blogspot.com said...

Thanks for reminding me and keeping me thinking positive. The adversary tries to creep into my thoughts.